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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
and examine the push to make changes to social security and medicare. >> brown: then, margaret warner looks at the political strife in egypt, after deadly clashes in the streets and resignations by top officials. >> woodruff: we have a battleground dispatch from a coastal city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close r directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that nnec us. and by the alfred p.
-called entitlements. many lawmakers and economists have argued it's essential to make big changes to medicare and social security. among those ideas are raising the eligibility age; means- testing for wealthy recipients; cuts in spending and benefits and a bigger role for private competition in health care. max richtman has been arguing against making many of these changes as part of this fight. he's the president of an advocacy group, the national committee to preserve social security and medicare. he joins us now. >> welcome. >> thank you for inviting me. >> first of all, why shouldn't social security and medicare be part of the entire group of government spending programs that are being looked at to get to deal with the deficits? >> well, before i answer that i was very interested in the way you characterized these programs as entitlements. so-called, you said, entitlements. and we think that a better term would be earned benefits. you know, i counted the letters in the word "entitlement." there are 11 letters. often people refer to entitlement as a four-letter word and it's a derogatory,
in medicare and medicaid. at the white house today, the president met with a bipartisan group of governors pressing his own plan for deficit reduction. that proposal, $1.6 trillion in revenue from tax increases on the wealthy and $600 billion in spending cuts mostly from reductions in medicare. he also wants authority to raise the debt ceiling without congressional intervention. but governors emerged afterwards treading a line between the two sides. delaware governor jack markel, a democrat, is chairman of the national governors association. >> we came not to embrace one plan or the other. we came to make it very clear, a, why it's so important that something happen both on the economic and on the fiscal issue and, b., to make sure that the president, the white house, the administration and members of congress realize that we are willing partners. >> reporter: republican scott walker of wisconsin and other leaders also urged the burden of medicaid spending for the poor not be shifted to the states. >> we hope there's going to be something that happens here in this nation's capital. in the
in marginal tax rates. and it would change eligibility for medicare and social security over the longer term. bob corker is from tennessee and joins us now from capitol hill. senator, welcome, and first of all, we heard late today that there was a phone conversation between the president and speaker boehner. have you heard anything about that? >> no, i haven't. i've been in multiple conversations today about this. but i've been in a meeting until right now for the last two hours. so i have not been aware of the phone conversation. sphwhrood well, we not hearing any reports other than the fact the call took place, but the fact that it took place, is that good news? >> oh, i don't know, judy. i think there are a the love discussions about what is the best way to get the type of entitlement reforms that everyone knows needs to take place, both republicans and democrats. judy, i have been in i don't know how many meetings in the last two years where there is a lot of commonality around the issue. as you know, the president has been, you know, sort of a-- not to be pejorative, but sort of a one-t
the cola, how fast social security benefits go up. raise the medicare eligibility age which is not so great. medicare plan b, raising the cost of the premium there. there are lots of options on the taebl and to get something that matches the 1.2 billion or trillion in new revenue, you got to have some real cuts, that is something he can offer boehner. >> woodruff: you touched on it, what about this conservative chorus now in the house who are saying that boehner has already given up by just even being willing to raise revenues. i mean and some of them are saying we're not sure we're going to vote for him for re-election. how much, does he really have serious pressure from the right or not? >> will with, i mean the problem he has is there's 18 of them. he threw four people off this week, three of them for not being sufficiently supportive of the caucus position, being to the right of the caucus. and so he starts off by making four enemies, basically,-- he's made enknee-- enemies. if 18 of them decided not to show up and vote for john boehner on the 3rd of january it would not be-- he would n
would also raise the future eligibility age for medicare and alter medicaid to save another $600 billion. the republican plan would not increase tax rates for the wealthy. the president is campaigning for his plan, taking questions on twitter today, and releasing this new web video. >> under my plan, first of all, 98% of folks who make less than $250,000, you wouldn't see your income taxes go up a single dime. all right? because you're the ones who need relief. >> ifill: treasury secretary timothy geithner met with congressional leaders last week and pressed the administration's case in a series of talk show appearances this weekend. >> rates are going to have to go up on the wealthiest americans. those rates are going to have to go up. >> there's no possibility that we're going to find a way to get our fiscal house in order without those tax rates going back up. >> there's no path to an agreement that does not involve republicans acknowledging that rates have to go up for the wealthiest americans. >> ifill: but boehner, also on a sunday talk show appearance pushed back. >> flabbergasted
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

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